The CT Jamboree is more than just a bike ride. Over the past five years, the event has raised more than $150,000 in support of Colorado residents living with multiple sclerosis. Funds generated from the ride benefit therapy programs, outreach and patient care. A small portion of proceeds also goes to the Colorado Trail Foundation. Participants are expected to raise $500 in lieu of an entry fee, but many top that, surpassing the $1,000 and even $2,000 mark. As to be expected, this years two-wheeled, 74-mile journey from Molas Pass to Junction Creek was nothing short of epic, as riders wheeled their ways through the full gamut of summer alpine conditions, including sun, rain, wind, lightning, hail, sleet and heat. In all, 18 riders partook in the tour with seven hearty souls taking on the one-day CT Classic race.

Sunny skies abound Saturday morning as riders approach the first
highpoint above Molas Pass. A cyclist stays just ahead of the hail on her way down from
Black Hawk Pass. Trail sweepersand on site bike mechanics Eric Confer, left, and
Jon Bailey, arrive at camp thirsty and wet, after hunkering down in
the trees during the afternoon squalls. A muddy, wet pack, eagerly discharched by a rider having reached
camp after the first 35-mile leg. Tour rider Mark Ritchey cruises under ominous skies
Saturday.

 

In this week's issue...

May 2, 2019
In the flow

Rafting season is already under way on the Animas River, which has been flowing at near record levels and almost double the average rate for this time of year.

April 25, 2019
Laying down the law

Over the past couple decades, Jeff Robbins’ work as an  oil and gas lawyer – with a specific focus on serving local communities – allowed him to build relationships and gain the experience needed to carry out one of Colorado’s most sweeping reforms to oil and gas regulations, Senate Bill 181. 

April 18, 2019
A new kind of cold war

It’s a good thing Heidi Steltzer can’t tolerate the heat or the open ocean. “I thought I wanted to be a marine biologist, and I got seasick,” said Steltzer, a professor in the Biology Department and Environmental Science program at Fort Lewis College.