Since 2002, locally owned and operated Zuberfizz has been pleasing the tastebuds of Durangoans both young and old with old-fashioned, tickle-your-nose soda pop. With an already overpopulated local beer industry, Durango native Bandon Zuber began experimenting with small batches of soda at home, and selling it through local mom and pop restaurants. Only five years later, and you can find Zuberfizz all around the region, and yes, even in Texas. Abandoning the reckless production habits of larger soda companies, Zuberfizz is sweetened with pure cane sugar, as opposed to the much dreaded high fructose corn syrup, and transferred into glass bottles, which gives it the authentic taste that every pop should have. Handcrafted in small batches, Zuberfizzs production, bottling and distribution all takes place from its humble headquarters located behind Durango Coffee Company. You can stop in for a root beer, and at the same time watch the newest batch of orange cream soda being bottled and boxed. Either way, it beats the hell out of a Pepsi-Cola. Ever wondered what the bottling process is all about? Here it is, from the tanks to your belly in six photographs.

Bandon Zuber stands by the line of giant tanks that house his
delicious concoctions. Here, a batch of grape soda gets filled and capped. After being filled and capped, the bottles get a quick, cool
bath before being boxed and shipped. Jason Bergman checks the fluid levels before packaging. The finished product. Jason Bergman drops the last three bottles into a case, which is
then sealed and shipped, ready for drinking enjoyment.

 

In this week's issue...

May 14, 2020
The great re-awakening

Shrouded in unknowns, the timeline for re-opening some businesses in Colorado came into clearer view Tuesday.

May 15, 2020
The best defense

Pandemics often bring pandemonium. It is easy to be fearful about coronavirus. But we already possess the greatest weapon on Earth against it: our amazing body and its powerful immune system.

May 7, 2020
Yes! The Farmers Market is opening

It may be hard to imagine, but while us humans are shuttered away in our houses, or hiding behind facemasks and Zoom meetings, the natural world is going on without us.